The Daguerreian Society Talk Series

The Daguerreian Society is offering a new series of weekly online talks, on Zoom, that span the history, artistry, and technology of the daguerreotype and other 19th century photographs. We already have an impressive slate of talks by renowned experts, collection tours, and other topics as they develop. We will add new talks here as they are scheduled.

Unless otherwise noted, each week a $25.00 tax-deductible donation to The Daguerreian Society (a tax-exempt, non-profit 501(c)3 organization) will enable participation in the Zoom presentation.

On the morning of the talk each participant will receive an email with the Zoom information including a unique passcode that we ask you not to share. Access to each talk will be by screen, not by person, so you can invite others to join you in person as you watch the presentation.

We have a primer on using Zoom here.

In addition, participants will be able to access high-quality video of the presentation, made available a few days after the presentation itself. Each video is accessed using the password sent the day of the presentation. If you are unable to attend a presentation live, you can  donate for it later, be sent the password, and watch on your own schedule. If you donate but misplace your password, contact talks@daguerreiansociety.org for a replacement. Passwords never expire, and can be used to watch a video multiple times.

Would you like to give a talk? We are soliciting proposals. Click here for more information.

If you have ideas or specific interests for presentations you'd like to see, please email talks@daguerreiansociety.org, post in our Facebook Group "The Daguerreian Society", or add to the blog on The Daguerreian Society's web site.

Upcoming Presentations

Special Halloween Stereo Talk — Get Ready!

We are pleased to announce our first talk in stereo by Denis Pellerin on Diableries from Dr. Brian May's London Stereoscopic Company collection. For this talk we highly recommend ordering glasses as early as possible.

All the images will be in side-by-side stereoscopic 3D, and can be watched in their full glory with a stereoscopic viewer (Lite Owl, Owl VR Kit, Loreo Pixi, prism glasses, or mirror viewers, depending on the size of your digital display).

The Lite OWL and Owl VR Kit can be bought from the London Stereoscopic Company's online shop: https://shop.londonstereo.com.

Loreo Pixi viewers, prism glasses, and mirror viewers can be had at Berezin Stereo: https://www.berezin.com/3d/viewers.htm.

Saturday September 26, 1:30 pm EDT: The Collins Family and the Business of Producing Daguerreotypes in Antebellum Philadelphia

Presented by Anne Verplanck.

David Collins by Root, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

The Philadelphia daguerreotype firm of T.P. and D.C. Collins incorporated knowledge from past pursuits, modeled some of their practices on those of other studios, and employed new strategies to appeal to clients.

To meet and create demand for a novel product, the Collinses depended in part on the introduction and timing of innovative methods and materials and corresponding capital expenditures. An analysis of their entrepreneurial and marketing strategies between 1845 and 1855 allows us to better understand how a small, urban business that employed limited technical improvements operated in an environment in which consumers increasingly prized innovation.

Thomas Collins by Simons, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

An examination of family members’ interests in the anti-slavery and temperance movements, as well as individuals’ skills and limitations, further explains the trajectory of their business. The firm’s difficulties in attracting and retaining daguerreotypists point to the challenges faced by all businesses that relied on skilled labor. Last, innovations—primarily others, but also theirs—in techniques and materials had an impact on the firm.

Although the Collinses operated in an environment in which they had ready access to the materials and knowledge needed for taking daguerreotypes and a significant, largely local and regional, clientele, their business ultimately failed. The attributes of their successes and failures contribute to an understanding of the roles of entrepreneurship, innovation, and marketing in small businesses in the middle years of the nineteenth century. An analysis of the Collins firm also provides a useful counterpoint to the large, urban daguerreotype firms and the rural, often itinerant, practitioners in the United States, Britain, and Europe.

Anne Verplanck, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of American Studies at Penn State, Harrisburg. Her decades-long museum career included serving as the Curator of Prints and Paintings at Winterthur Museum from 2000 to 2009. In her museum and academic positions, she has curated exhibitions on and written extensively about 18th- and 19th-century American art. Her current project, The Business of Art: The Graphic Arts in an Age of Mechanical Reproduction, analyzes of the financial underpinnings and creative output of artists, printers, publishers, photographers, and others in the art world, broadly writ; this work is supported by grants from the NEH and the Library Company of Philadelphia. The book's aim is to provide new perspectives on artistic patronage, production, and distribution; urban development; and business practices. A graduate of Connecticut College, Anne earned her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at the College of William and Mary.

Donate to see The Collins Family and the Business of Producing Daguerreotypes in Antebellum Philadelphia. You will be sent Zoom meeting information the morning of the meeting, and afterward  have access to high-quality video of the presentation.

Saturday October 3, 1:30 pm EDT: The Artistry and Influence of the Carte de Visite in 1860s America

Presented by Ronald S. Coddington.

Donate to see The Artistry and Influence of the Carte de Visite in 1860s America. You will be sent Zoom meeting information the morning of the meeting, and afterward  have access to high-quality video of the presentation.

Saturday October 10, 1:30 pm EDT: Photographing the Rogues: The Police and 19th Century Photography

Presented by Shayne Davidson.

Donate to see Photographing the Rogues: The Police and 19th Century Photography. You will be sent Zoom meeting information the morning of the meeting, and afterward  have access to high-quality video of the presentation.

Previous Presentations

Saturday September 19, 1:30 pm EDT: The Daguerreotype in Mexico: Origin and Evolution

Presented by Fernando Osorio-Alarcón.

This talk presents the eight early daguerreotype plates made in Mexico in December 1839 and January 1840 by Jean Prelier Duboille, and today in the Gabriel Cromer Collection of the Eastman Museum. The process of identification and the subsequent research is discussed, as well as the evolution of the daguerreotype invention after its introduction to the Mexican society.

Image courtesy of the Colección Museo Franz Mayer, México, ADD 005/ADD005.

Fernando Osorio-Alarcón is a Mexican scholar specializing in photography and imaging preservation. He has been director of conservation of diverse public and private collections, and has been a professor and researcher of photography preservation for more than 35 years. He lives in Mexico City and is a frequent traveler and lecturer in several archives and collections in South America. He contributes to UNESCO Memory of the World Program as an active member of the Subcommittee of Preservation.

If you missed The Daguerreotype in Mexico: Origin and Evolution and would like access to this recording, you can donate here and will be sent the password.

Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

Saturday September 12, 1:30 pm EDT: The Rise of Photojournalism: Through the Daguerreian Era and Into the Civil War

Presented by Bob Zeller.

Joseph Avery stranded on Rocks in the Niagara River, Library of Congress

It didn’t take long for the world’s early daguerreotypists to begin capturing images of newsworthy events, as lecturer Bob Zeller shows in his image-rich, one-hour presentation The Rise of Photojournalism Through the Daguerreian Era and the Civil War.

Parades, funerals, fires, floods, train wrecks, political rallies, wars, and hangings were part of life in the 1840 and 1850s and the visual record of some of them were preserved on silver plates. The first war ever photographed – the Mexican War – is featured, as well as the California Gold Rush, where Zeller focuses on lost daguerreotypes of news events that were preserved only as lithographs as well as plates that have survived.

The talk also features history’s first documented combat action photographs as well as several remarkable four-frame sequential wet plate photos taken in 1864 that reveal themselves as crude motion pictures when animated. As he reaches the end of the war, he shows how news events were being photographed as they happened in moment-by-moment images, even though the first halftone newspaper photo was still 15 years in the future. But he closes the show, he returns to daguerreotypes, with three final photojournalistic plates taken in 1865 and 1867.

Writer and historian Bob Zeller is the co-founder and president of The Center for Civil War Photography – www.civilwarphotography.org – which was established as a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation in 2001. He also edits the organization’s historical journal, Battlefield Photographer.

As a lecturer on Civil War photography for more than 30 years, Zeller has presented 3-D shows at the Library of Congress, the National Archives, the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Associates, Museum of the Confederacy, Chrysler Museum, the Newseum, the Norman Rockwell Museum, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, the Maryland Historical Society and more than 150 other venues.

If you missed The Rise of Photojournalism: Through the Daguerreian Era and Into the Civil War and would like access to this recording, you can donate here and will be sent the password.

Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

Saturday September 5, 1:30 pm EDT: Members' Favorites

Moderated by Michael Lehr.

This talk was exclusive and free to all members of The Daguerreian Society. It features members talking about some of their favorite images. Members who attended will have a password to access the video sent the day of the presentation. Members who didn't attend, lost the password, or joined after the presentation, please contact us.

Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

If you aren't a member and would like to see this talk, maybe it's a good time to join the Society?

Saturday August 15, 1:30 pm EDT: Seeing the Elephant: Photography and the American Civil War

Presented by Jeff L. Rosenheim.

As the Civil War ravaged the United States, photographers were present to document and memorialize the fierce conflict. For the first time ever, the camera recorded a long and ferocious war from the beginning to end. This was not only a brutal test of the young American republic but also a watershed in the history of photography.

(From the jacket of Photography and the American Civil War by Jeff L. Rosenheim. Lincoln tintype campaign button photo courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.)

Jeff L. Rosenheim is Curator in Charge in the Department of Photographs at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Jeff fell under the magical spell of photography as a 10-year old and has had the pleasure of working at the Met for 32 years. He is the author of Photography and the American Civil War.

If you missed Seeing the Elephant: Photography and the American Civil War and would like access to this recording, you can donate here and will be sent the password.

Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

Saturday August 8, 1:30 pm EDT: Spirit Photography

Presented by Bill Becker.

Do you believe in ghosts? How about ghosts you can actually see, in 150 year old photographs?

Photography historian Bill Becker explores the bizarre story of spirit photography in this webinar, tracing the origins of the modern spiritualist movement during the daguerreotype period and the first explosion of spirit photography after the US Civil War. You’ll get a revealing first-person look into the making of the most famous ghost photograph — and learn the gigantic mistake that accidentally exposed the truth about that important image.

Image courtesy Wm. B. Becker collection/PhotographyMuseum.com

Bill Becker has collected and researched early photography for more than 50 years. An original member of The Daguerreian Society, he currently serves the Society as a board member and board secretary. American portrait photographs from Bill’s collection were exhibited at the home of Daguerre in Bry-sur-Marne (2013) and at the MIT Museum (2014-2015), accompanied by the book Daguerre’s American Legacy. Other exhibitions drawn from the Wm. B. Becker collection were shown at the Krannert Art Museum (University of Illinois), the Meadow Brook Art Gallery of Oakland University, the Grand Rapids Art Museum, Henry Ford Museum (in conjunction with the Walle Collection) and the South East Museum of Photography.

Spirit photographs from Bill’s collection have also been included in exhibitions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Albertina Museum, Magasin 3 Stockholm Konsthall, and the Maison Europeenne de la Photographie. Bill has spoken on the topic of spirit photography to groups as varied as the Victorian Society in America and the Los Angeles Conference on the History of Magic.

Bill Becker is director of the American Museum of Photography, an online-only museum (www.photographymuseum.com ); his next book, a monograph on the photographer Edwin Hale Lincoln, is scheduled for publication by Steidl later this year.

If you missed Spirit Photography and would like access to this recording, you can donate here and will be sent the password.

Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

Saturday August 1, 1:30 pm EDT: The Daguerreotype and the 1851 Great Exhibition

Presented by Anthony Hamber.

The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations took place in the purpose-built Crystal Palace in London’s Hyde Park between May and October 1851 and received some six million visitors. The official report stated that “never before was so rich a collection of photographic pictures brought together.” Daguerreotypes gained the best reviews and American Daguerreotypes stole the show.

This talk surveys the role of the Daguerreotype at the Great Exhibition, including the Daguerreotypes and Daguerreotype equipment exhibited, the Daguerreotypes taken of the Exhibition and its contents, and finally the exploitation of the Daguerreotype to aid the production of illustrations for a wide range of contemporary publications.

Anthony Hamber is an independent photographic historian and was awarded his Ph.D. from the University of London for his study on the photography of the fine arts in England 1839 to 1880. This was published in an extended version by Gordon and Breach in 1996 as “A Higher Branch of the Art”; Photographing the Fine Arts in England 1839-1880 and became the subject of an exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

He has been researching, publishing, and teaching on the history of early photography and the 1851 Great Exhibition for more than two decades. His book Photography and the 1851 Great Exhibition was published by Oak Knoll Press and V & A Publications in 2018 in conjunction with the opening the Photography Gallery at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

A member of Advisory Board of the Talbot Catalogue Raisonné project based at the Bodleian Library in Oxford, Anthony is an expert on 19th century photographically illustrated publications and has been building an annotated international bibliography for many years, with the aim of future online publication.

If you missed The Daguerreotype and the 1851 Great Exhibition and would like access to this recording, you can donate here and will be sent the password.

Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

Saturday July 25, 1:30 pm EDT: Highlights of the Daguerreotype in Argentina & Uruguay

Presented by Carlos Vertanessian.

Born in Argentina, Carlos G. Vertanessian has been a member of the Daguerreian Society since the early 1990s.  He earned an agronomical engineering degree at the Universidad de Buenos Aires. His lifetime passion for photography and imagery led him to develop a carrier in marketing, introducing holography to Argentina, and later spreading his business to cover promotional & cultural marketing.

For over 35 years Carlos has been collecting early accounts of the origins of photography and daguerreotypes and other hard images taken in Argentina and Uruguay, and has recently become a part time dealer in Latin American images. He has thus put together one of the largest specialized collections in Latin America. Over the last five years he has been actively engaged in a personal crusade to spread the “daguerreian word” in his own country, and also to visit public and private collections elsewhere, to better understand the daguerreian period and the way photography spread around the world. As a special tribute to Daguerre, he has commissioned the creation of a limited edition bronze bust of the “magician of light.”

He takes special pleasure in researching and “reading” daguerreian period images, and has published two books relating early photography and visual culture in Argentina. The last one -released in December 2018- is the result of 8 years of research and has a prologue by Grant Romer. This work has gained the highest recognition since both the Ministry of National Culture and the Academy of Fine Arts declared it of “national interest”. In 2019 he helped catalog and curate the collection of daguerreotypes of the National History Museum of Argentina for the publication of a catalogue raisonné, released right after. He believes collecting early photography is about discovering and collecting their stories, and that it should be about “pleasure, knowledge and sharing”.

If you missed Highlights of the Daguerreotype in Argentina & Uruguay and would like access to this recording, you can donate here and will be sent the password.

Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

Saturday July 18, 1:30 pm EDT: The Daguerreotype: A Contemporary Approach

The Daguerreotype: A Contemporary Approach was presented on July 18 by Jerry Spagnoli and Mike Robinson.

Jerry Spagnoli lives and works in New York City. He is currently working on a series of historical documentation projects. The preoccupation of these projects is how the personal experience of history and the "objective" document of it are enmeshed. Within this series is a continuing exploration of the daguerreotype and the collotype and their potential as contemporary photographic mediums.

His most recent book Regard was published by Steidl. His other monographs include American Dreaming and Daguerreotypes published by Steidl, and Heirloom Harvest Published in 2015 by Bloomsbury.

His collaborations with Chuck Close have resulted in two monographs, A Couple of Ways of Doing Something, published by Aperture, and Daguerreotypes published by Gabrius. A collaboration with Karl Lagerfeld has produced a monograph and show entitled The Glory of Water.

His work has appeared in many books and publications, among them are Watching the World Change, by David Friend, Photography's Antiquarian Avant Garde, by Lyle Rexer, 21st: A Journal of Contemporary Photography Volume VI: Flesh and Spirit, Vanity Fair, DoubleTake Magazine, Adbusters, Metropolis and Graphis.

His work is held in the collections of The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, The National Portrait Gallery, The Nelson Atkins Museum, Musee d’Elysee, Musee Carnevalet, The Fogg Museum, The Museum of Modern Art, The Chrystler Museum, The Art Institute of Chicago, The High Museum, The New York Historical Society, and other major collections

Dr. Mike Robinson is an artist-practitioner, teacher, conservator, and historian of the daguerreotype. In June 2017 he earned his PhD in Photographic History with dissertation titled TheTechniques and Material Aesthetics of the Daguerreotype. He has researched and written on the studio practice of Southworth and Hawes for the Young America catalog and for The Daguerreian Society Annual.

Mike taught graduate and undergraduate courses in 19th Century Photographic Processes at Ryerson University in Toronto, and has lectured and taught daguerreotype workshops in Toronto, Rochester, New York City, Lacock Abbey UK, Bry-sur-Marne France, and Kolomna Russia.

Mike’s daguerreotypes are in the collections of The Portrait Gallery of Canada, The Art Gallery of Ontario, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Nelson-Atkins Museum, The Carnegie-Mellon, The Snite Museum, The Fox Talbot Museum, The George Eastman House International Museum of Photography, Musée Metienne, The Russian Museum of Photography and in many private collections.

If you missed The Daguerreotype: A Contemporary Approach and would like access to this recording, you can donate here and will be sent the password.

Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

Saturday July 11, 1:30 pm EDT: French Daguerreotypes

This talk on French daguerreotypes was given by Malcolm Daniel, curator of photography at The Museum of Fine Arts Houston. Malcom was the organizer of the memorable 2004 show The Dawn of Photography: French Daguerreotypes, 1839-1855 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

If you missed French Daguerreotypes and would like access to this recording, you can donate here and will be sent the password.

Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

Saturday July 4, 1:30 pm EDT: Face to Face with the Revolution

In this one-hour talk on the 244th anniversary of our nation's birth, Joe Bauman presents his unparalleled collection of identified photographic portraits of soldiers, and one sailor, who served in America's Revolutionary War as young men and lived through the Daguerreian Era. These people were now in their eighties, nineties, and even one-hundreds when they were daguerreotyped or photographed by the CDV camera.

As Joe puts it: "Nothing comes close to the time-machine thrill of looking into the eyes of a man whose same eyes had watched George Washington on the battlefield."

Joe Bauman has spent most of his life shoveling words mainly as a journalist,  starting in 1963 as editor and columnist for his high-school paper, the Kwajpodge, and later as a reporter, editor, blogger, columnist, freelancer – and also as an author of fiction and non-fiction books.

He worked as a reporter and cameraman at WBOC-TV, Salisbury, Maryland; The Beachcomber newspaper covering Ocean City, Maryland, and based in Selbyville, Delaware; the Delmarva News, Selbyville, and the Deseret News in Salt Lake City. He began with the last in 1971 and retired in 2008, having covered federal courts, medicine, the environment and (for many years) science. He still contributes astronomy articles to the paper, one or two a month.

In 1970 Joe was photographing and writing a feature article about a flea market near the Delaware coast, when he ran across a table filled with knickknacks among which were three cased images. He had never seen anything like them. One was a photo on glass, not in good shape. The others were images on silver plates, an old woman sitting at a table piled with books, and a young man who looked like Paul Newman wearing an outrageously long cravat. He thought the metal pictures were badly faded or somehow broken, because when turned most directions they were negatives glaring in the sunlight, and only when he got something dark reflecting onto them were they positives. He bought all three.

Since then Joe and his wife Cory have collected all sorts of antique photos, but mostly daguerreotypes. His family now has hundreds of pre-1900 images of many varieties. They are intrigued with the tie to history, their intimacy and, as far as daguerreotypes are concerned, the unmatched beauty of the process.

Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

This talk was exclusive and free to all members of The Daguerreian Society. Members who attended will have a password to access the video sent the day of the presentation. Members who didn't attend, lost the password, or joined after the presentation, please contact us.

If you aren't a member and would like to see this talk, maybe it's a good time to join the Society?

Saturday June 27, 1:30 pm EDT: Southworth and Hawes

A two-hour conversation on Southworth and Hawes by Mike Robinson and Grant Romer drawing from the collection at The George Eastman House.

Dr. Mike Robinson is an artist-practitioner, teacher, conservator, and historian of the daguerreotype. In June 2017 he earned his PhD in Photographic History with dissertation titled The Techniques and Material Aesthetics of the Daguerreotype. He has researched and written on the studio practice of Southworth and Hawes for the Young America catalog and for The Daguerreian Society Annual.

Mike taught graduate and undergraduate courses in 19th Century Photographic Processes at Ryerson University in Toronto, and has lectured and taught daguerreotype workshops in Toronto, Rochester, New York City, Lacock Abbey UK, Bry-sur-Marne France, and Kolomna Russia.

Mike’s daguerreotypes are in the collections of The Portrait Gallery of Canada, The Art Gallery of Ontario, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Nelson-Atkins Museum, The Carnegie-Mellon, The Snite Museum, The Fox Talbot Museum, The George Eastman House International Museum of Photography, Musée Metienne, The Russian Museum of Photography and in many private collections.

Grant Romer holds a BFA from Pratt Institute and an MFA from Rochester Institute of Technology. In 1976, he joined the staff of the George Eastman House, becoming its Conservator of Photography in 1989. He was Director of the Andrew W, Mellon Foundation Advanced Residency Program in Photograph Conservation from 1999 to 2010. He has had a distinguished career as leading educator in this field. Having retired in 2010, Romer holds the title Scholar In Residence at George Eastman House and continues to be active as a researcher, consultant and lecturer. He has served many of the world’s most important institutional photographic collections, including the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia: the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; Harvard and Yale Universities, The J. Paul Getty Museum; The Vatican; The National Palace Museum, Taiwan; The Israel Museum; The British Museum; and the national archives and libraries of Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico and the United States. He has received fellowships from such entities as the Japan Foundation, the Gulbenkian Foundation; the Churchill Heritage Trust; the Max Planck Institute; the Getty Trust; the Gould Foundation; the Kress Foundation. He has held two Fulbright Fellowships, In 2012, while participating in the “CdF Jornadas: 8”, organized by the Centro Municipal de Fotografia de Montevideo, Romer was declared an “Illustrious Visitor” and presented an award by the Mayor of Montevideo, in recognition of his contributions to the Conservation of Photographs in Latin America, particularly through education.

Romer is recognized as a world authority on early photography, particularly the history, practice and conservation of the Daguerreotype. He has written and lectured extensively on many other aspects of photographic history. He has served as curator for many exhibitions while at Eastman House, most notably, "Young America-The Daguerreotypes of Southworth & Hawes." The Daguerreian Society awarded Romer its Lifetime Achievement Award in 2010. In 2014 Romer and Ariadna Cervera Xicotencatl, founded the Academy of Archaic Imaging, dedicated to exploring the history of the application of technology to depicting visual experience. Romer maintains that practical experience with such devices as the various forms of Camera Obscura, Camera Lucida, Perspectograph, and Pantograph is essential to understanding the origins, progress and transformations of Imaging Technology. Two Academy programs in collaboration with Fernando Osorio have been given 2016 and 2017 at the Centro de la Imagen in Mexico City.

If you missed Southworth and Hawes and would like access to this recording, you can donate here and will be sent the password.

Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

Saturday June 20, 1:30 pm EDT: Managing, Cataloging, Storing, and Digitizing your Daguerreotype Collection

This one-hour presentation starts with Mike Robinson on digitizing your daguerreotypes, followed by Len Walle and Phil Nathanson discussing how to manage, catalog and store your photographic collections.

These topics are some of our most asked-about subjects in the Daguerreian Society's Facebook group. If you aren't a member the group you are missing a wealth of information daily about daguerreotypes and other pre-1870s images.

Collection catalog templates mentioned in the talk. Templates from Len Walle are courtesy of Cliff Krainik:

Len Walle became interested in photography at a very early age and is a Daguerreian Society founding member. After an education in chemistry and business, he worked professionally in the graphic arts industry for over 30 years. Len serves on the University of Michigan Clements Library Associates Board of Governors, the board of the National Stereoscopic Association, the board of the Michigan Photographic Historical Society and is past president / board member of The Daguerreian Society and past president of the Detroit Institute of Arts Forum for Prints, Drawings and Photographs. Combining an interest in history and art, he continues to study the common bond between explorers, artists and scientists during the 19th century as well as the ability of the daguerreotype to capture in its own special way the human spirit through portraiture. In 2018 he received The Daguerreian Society Fellowship Award for the advancement of scholarship in the field of photo history and the willingness to share that knowledge.

Phil Nathanson has been a long-time collector of books, ephemera and photography. His main collecting interest for almost four decades has been 19th century photography. He is an active researcher and has published books including "Early Southern California Photography. The Continent Stereoscopic Company" and "W.A. Vale: Pioneer Photographer." He has lectured about Southern California photography to historical societies, museums and collector organizations. Phil is a member of the Zamorano Club, the Westerners and other historical organizations. He holds BA and MS degrees from UCLA, and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. Phil has been a member of the Daguerreian Society since 1999.

If you missed Managing, Cataloging, Storing, and Digitizing your Daguerreotype Collection and would like access to this recording, you can donate here and will be sent the password.

Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

Saturday June 13, 1:30 pm EDT: Interrogating the Photograph as Object

Image Identification, the first 20 years. Connoisseurship and process with Grant Romer and Roger Watson. Moderated by Mike Robinson.

Roger Watson is currently the Curator of the Fox Talbot Museum at Lacock. He has previously been the Assistant Director of Museum Studies at the George Eastman House in Rochester, New York and has consulted for the Science Museum and the Guildhall Library, London and for Christie's Auction House in New York and London. In 1997 he discovered the first photographs made in Canada, which were also the first views of Niagara Falls. He is co-author of Capturing the Light, a comparative biography of Talbot and Daguerre, and a Daguerreian Society member since 1991.

Grant Romer holds a BFA from Pratt Institute and an MFA from Rochester Institute of Technology. In 1976, he joined the staff of the George Eastman House, becoming its Conservator of Photography in 1989. He was Director of the Andrew W, Mellon Foundation Advanced Residency Program in Photograph Conservation from 1999 to 2010. He has had a distinguished career as leading educator in this field. Having retired in 2010, Romer holds the title Scholar In Residence at George Eastman House and continues to be active as a researcher, consultant and lecturer. He has served many of the world’s most important institutional photographic collections, including the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia: the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; Harvard and Yale Universities, The J. Paul Getty Museum; The Vatican; The National Palace Museum, Taiwan; The Israel Museum; The British Museum; and the national archives and libraries of Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico and the United States. He has received fellowships from such entities as the Japan Foundation, the Gulbenkian Foundation; the Churchill Heritage Trust; the Max Planck Institute; the Getty Trust; the Gould Foundation; the Kress Foundation. He has held two Fulbright Fellowships, In 2012, while participating in the “CdF Jornadas: 8”, organized by the Centro Municipal de Fotografia de Montevideo, Romer was declared an “Illustrious Visitor” andpresented an award by the Mayor of Montevideo, in recognition of his contributions to the Conservation of Photographs in Latin America, particularly through education.

Romer is recognized as a world authority on early photography, particularly the history, practice and conservation of the Daguerreotype. He has written and lectured extensively on many other aspects of photographic history. He has served as curator for many exhibitions while at Eastman House, most notably, "Young America-The Daguerreotypes of Southworth & Hawes." The Daguerreian Society awarded Romer its Lifetime Achievement Award in 2010. In 2014 Romer and Ariadna Cervera Xicotencatl, founded the Academy of Archaic Imaging, dedicated to exploring the history of the application of technology to depicting visual experience. Romer maintains that practical experience with such devices as the various forms of Camera Obscura, Camera Lucida, Perspectograph, and Pantograph is essential to understanding the origins, progress and transformations of Imaging Technology. Two Academy programs in collaboration with Fernando Osorio have been given 2016 and 2017 at the Centro de la Imagen in Mexico City.

If you missed Interrogating the Photograph as Object and would like access to this recording, you can donate here and will be sent the password.

Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

Saturday June 6, 1:30 pm EDT: Mike Robinson's Daguerre's Legacy

This presentation retraces Louis Jacques Mande Daguerre’s pathway of discovery and innovation that led to the invention of the daguerreotype process. The historical canon is revised with new details obtained by revisiting the historical record informed by artisanal, tacit, and causal knowledge gained from making new daguerreotypes in the laboratory.

Dr. Mike Robinson is an artist-practitioner, teacher, conservator, and historian of the daguerreotype. In June 2017 he earned his PhD in Photographic History with dissertation titled The Techniques and Material Aesthetics of the Daguerreotype. He has researched and written on the studio practice of Southworth and Hawes for the Young America catalog and for The Daguerreian Society Annual.

Mike taught graduate and undergraduate courses in 19th Century Photographic Processes at Ryerson University in Toronto, and has lectured and taught daguerreotype workshops in Toronto, Rochester, New York City, Lacock Abbey UK, Bry-sur-Marne France, and Kolomna Russia.

Mike’s daguerreotypes are in the collections of The Portrait Gallery of Canada, The Art Gallery of Ontario, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Nelson-Atkins Museum, The Carnegie-Mellon, The Snite Museum, The Fox Talbot Museum, The George Eastman House International Museum of Photography, Musée Metienne, The Russian Museum of Photography and in many private collections.

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Link to video (you will need to supply the password for the presentation; open the link in a new window to watch the video full screen).

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